High and Low Art – Bazooka Joe to Andy Warhol to Roy Lichenstein

Bazooka Joe

Bazooka Joe is a comic strip character featured on small comics included inside individually wrapped pieces of Bazooka bubble gum. He wears a black eyepatch, lending him a distinctive appearance. He is one of the more recognizable American advertising characters of the 20th century, due to worldwide distribution, and one of the few identifiable ones associated with a candy.

Roy Lichenstein

Roy Fox Lichtenstein[1] (/ˈlɪktənˌstn/; October 27, 1923 – September 29, 1997) was an American pop artist. During the 1960s, along with Andy WarholJasper Johns, and James Rosenquist among others, he became a leading figure in the new art movement. His work defined the premise of pop art through parody.[2] Inspired by the comic strip, Lichtenstein produced precise compositions that documented while they parodied, often in a tongue-in-cheek manner. His work was influenced by popular advertising and the comic book style. He described pop art as “not ‘American’ painting but actually industrial painting”.[3] His paintings were exhibited at the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City.

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol (/ˈwɔːrhɒl/;[1] born Andrew Warhola; August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987) was an American artist, film director, and producer who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, advertising, and celebrity culture that flourished by the 1960s, and span a variety of media, including painting, silkscreening, photography, film, and sculpture. Some of his best known works include the silkscreen paintings Campbell’s Soup Cans (1962) and Marilyn Diptych (1962), the experimental films Empire (1964) and Chelsea Girls (1966), and the multimedia events known as the Exploding Plastic Inevitable (1966–67).

Leo Burnett 

Leo Burnett (October 21, 1891 – June 7, 1971) was an American advertising executive and the founder of Leo Burnett Company, Inc.. He was responsible for creating some of advertising’s most well-known characters and campaigns of the 20th century, including Tony the Tiger, the Marlboro Man, the Maytag RepairmanUnited‘s “Fly the Friendly Skies”, and Allstate‘s “Good Hands”, and for garnering relationships with multinational clients such as McDonald’sHallmark and Coca-Cola.[1] In 1999, Burnett was named by Time Magazine as one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century.[2]

“BatMan” and Bazooka Joe

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